What share of adults who were interested, but did not attend, cited lack of someone to go with as a barrier?

The most common major motivation U.S. adults cite for attending the arts is to socialize with their family members or friends. For many people, not having someone to go with can be a barrier that ultimately discourages them from attending.

Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.
Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.
Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Not having someone to go with was a much more common barrier among older individuals. For exhibits, this barrier was increasingly common with age. For performances, younger adults also frequently mentioned social barriers to attendance.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Respondents with young children rarely say that having no-one to go with prevented them from attending the arts.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
Women were significantly more likely than men to say not having someone to go with prevented their attendance at art exhibits. For performances, there was no significant difference by gender.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.
African-Americans or other Blacks, non-Hispanics, as well as Hispanics of Mexican origin, were significantly more likely than U.S. adults of other races or ethnicities to indicate not having someone to go with prevented their attending the arts.