Podcasts

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Headshots of a man.

Photo by Maria Ventura

Producing Artistic Director and Founder of Native Voices

For almost 25 years, Native Voices at the Autry has been providing opportunities and support to Native American playwrights…and by extension Native actors, designers, musicians and other theater artists. It is the country’s only Equity theatre company dedicated exclusively to producing new works by Native American, Alaska Native, and First Nations playwrights. Deeply committed to developing as well as producing new work, Native Voices also provides a venue for new plays with festivals and public staged readings as well as retreats and workshops for emerging and established Native playwrights. Randy Reinholz is a founder of Native Voices and has been its producing artistic director since its inception. In this podcast, Randy talks about the unique and changing points of view Native artists bring to the table, the issues facing Indian Country, and the place theater has in telling Native stories.

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Photo courtesy of HBO

Actor, director, producer

Actor Jeffrey Wright discusses the documentary he produced for HBO, We Are Not Done Yet, which profiles a group of veterans and service members as they come together to collaborate on a series of poems. The former and current service members are part of a United Services Organizations’ writing workshop at Walter Reed National Military Center; and, all of them struggle to cope with PTSD. The workshop creates a safe place for them to grapple with their experiences through poetry. In fact, they decide not just to write a poem collectively but to present a publicly staged reading of it. That’s where actor Jeffrey Wright came in—he had worked with veterans in the past and was looking for an opportunity to involve himself again. He came to Walter Reed to direct the staged reading of the poem. And that experience became the HBO documentary We Are Not Done Yet. Listen to this conversation with Jeffrey Wright about his work with these veterans, his continuing relationships with them, and his commitment to making sure their stories are heard.

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Photo Courtesy of Folger Theatre

Actor

Actor Dria Brown talks about playing Joan in Bedlam’s almost postmodern production of George Bernard Shaw’s St. Joan in DC’s Folger Theatre. It’s stripped down in every way: minimal sets and costumes and a cast of four; Dria plays Joan and only Joan; the other three actors juggle 26 roles. The rehearsals were interesting. We hear about her growing up in South Carolina, how time in her father’s church readied her for the role, and her desire to get the audience to engage with the performance.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston

Actor

Taking on the role of a lifetime: Rosa Parks in Behind the Movement

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Photo courtesy of Arena Stage

Director

Interpreting history with All the Way and The Great Society.

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Walter Ware

Photo courtesy of Walter Ware III

Casting Director

Casting Director Walter Ware III brings the right people together. Read all about the behind-the-scenes crew in NEA Arts

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Photo courtesy of Spiderwoman Theater

Artistic director and founding member of Spiderwoman Theater

Forty years on, the first Native-American women’s theater is still going strong.

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Photo courtesy of SimonSays Entertainment

Actor and Tony- Award winning Producer

Shining a light on untold stories.

Founder of the Big Apple Circus

Finding artistry in intimacy

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Headshot of a woman.

Photo by Joe Flood

Founder, CEO and President of the Capital Fringe Festival

Making theater happen in DC

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