ART WORKS Guidelines: Dance

American dance is encyclopedic in scope and international in its aesthetic traditions. The National Endowment for the Arts is committed to advancing the nation's full range of dance artistry. The National Endowment for the Arts assists all forms of professional dance by funding dance companies and presenters, service organizations, festivals, convenings, community engagement, education activities, and projects of all sizes. The NEA also supports the documentation and preservation of choreography and performance, and other aspects of dance history. Dance projects funded by the National Endowment for the Arts represent a multiplicity of forms, styles, techniques, and histories that come from every continent in the world and the many different styles -- ballet, modern dance, jazz, folkloric, tap, hip-hop, and other contemporary forms such as aerial work and site specific performances -- that are found in the United States.

Projects

Art Works applications will be accepted under two deadlines. All project types are accepted under both deadlines. Generally, an organization is limited to one application per year under the Art Works category.

Deadlines

First Art Works Deadline:

Step 1 - Submit SF-424 to Grants.gov February 18, 2016
Step 2 - Submit Materials to NEA-GO February 25, 2016 to March 3, 2016
Earliest Announcement of Grant Award or Rejection November 2016
Earliest Beginning Date for National Endowment for the Arts Period of Performance January 1, 2017

Second Art Works Deadline:

Step 1 - Submit SF-424 to Grants.gov July 14, 2016
Step 2 - Submit Materials to NEA-GO July 21, 2016 to July 28, 2016
Earliest Announcement of Grant Award or Rejection April 2017
Earliest Beginning Date for National Endowment for the Arts Period of Performance June 1, 2017

Dance Companies, Presenters, Service Organizations, and other organizations may apply for projects such as, but not limited to:

  • Commissioning and development of dance works.
  • Innovative dance projects that create new work through the use of new models, technology, or new media.
  • The restaging of repertory.
  • Regional and national tours.
  • Home-based performances.
  • The presentation of dance companies.
  • Dance festivals.
  • Services to dancers, choreographers, and companies. This may include activities such as convening, data collection, information sharing, and technical assistance.
  • Residencies and choreography workshops for artists where the primary purpose is to further artistic exploration and/or create new art.
  • Touring and performance activity that emphasizes outreach to underserved communities. (If your project is for youth, see "Choosing the Right Discipline for Youth Projects" to help you in your discipline selection.)
  • Innovative methods of engaging audiences, including collaborations with other organizations, through new models that have the potential to maximize resources and/or the impact on the audience, artists, or the field.
  • The restaging of master works of historical significance.
  • Innovative uses of new models, technology, or new media to document and/or perpetuate choreography, technique, or dance process.
  • Documentation, preservation, and conservation of America's dance heritage.
  • Professional training including classes, guest artist residencies, workshops, and mentorship of dance artists.
  • The development of plans for growth of the dance sector in the local community.
  • The development of artist live/work spaces.