Grants

Compliance With NEPA and NHPA

If you are recommended for a grant and your project has the potential to effect environmental or historic resources, your project may be subject to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and/or the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and the National Endowment for the Arts will conduct a review of your project to ensure that it is in compliance with NEPA/NHPA.

Below are the questions you will need to answer for the National Endowment for the Arts to conduct a review of your project to ensure that it is in compliance with NEPA/NHPA.

  1. Provide a short assessment of whether your project has the potential to have an effect on environmental or historic resources and whether that effect is an adverse effect. We will review the documentation and make our own finding. Please note, if your project will never physically alter a district, site, building, landscape, structure or object, or you're not working on a plan or design for a district, site, building, landscape, structure or object, please state this as your reason why your project does not have the potential to have an adverse effect on environmental or historic resources. For example, if you are producing a poetry festival in an existing space and will not use the space for anything but temporary programming, your project may not have the potential to have an adverse effect on environmental or historic resources under NEPA/NHPA.

  2. For the purposes of questions (a)-(i) below, a "National Historic Register Site" or an "NRHP Site" means project activities on any district, site, building, structure, landscape or object that is included or eligible for inclusion on the National Register, both individually or as a contributing element. Generally, NRHP Sites will include (1) any building/site 50 years old or older, (2) any building/site included or eligible for inclusion in the NRHP, or (3) located in a historic district.

  3. Additionally, for the purposes of the questions (a)-(i) below, please note that for a project to be "temporary" it must be 100% reversible.

    Does your project involve any of the following activities? If so, please explain with as much specificity as possible.

    1. Does your project involve in-kind replacements or repairs?
    2. Does your project involve a festival/public event of limited size or duration? If so, will there be any permanent effects on a NRHP Site(s) or to any structures/installations erected or installed (temporary or permanent) NRHP Site(s)?
    3. Does your project involve outdoor murals or other art on a NRHP Site(s) or adjacent to a NRHP Site(s)?
    4. Does your project involve temporary public art on a building 50 years or older (e.g., sculpture, statuary, banners, mixed media, painting)? If so, does the project necessitate the installation of hardware on a NRHP Site(s)?
    5. Does your project involve erecting or placing permanent wayfinding signs (e.g., artistic directional signs) adjacent to or on a NRHP Site(s)?
    6. Does your project involve installing small structures (e.g., benches, bus shelters, produce stands) attached to or dependent on a building a NRHP Site(s)? If so, please describe the ground disturbance necessary for such an installation.
    7. Does your project involve landscape maintenance or rehabilitation (e.g., community garden, urban park) on a NRHP Site(s)? If so, where? Will it include the addition of or new large-scale landscape elements?
    8. Does your project involve conceptual planning/design/research (e.g., feasibility and planning studies, early design development work/conceptual drawings and renderings, asset mapping, design charrettes)?
    9. Does your project involve information gathering/data analysis/ information dissemination (e.g., historic and cultural demonstrations, public affairs actions, studies, reports, document mailings, data analysis)?
  4. If you are proposing a public art project, temporary or permanent, or you are designing or planning a district, building, site, landscape, structure or object, you must provide us with the following detailed information:

    • Provide a very clear description of the district, building, site, landscape, structure, or object in which you will be working, even if it is just planning or design activities. Include the address(es).
    • If any element of the district, building, site, landscape, structure or object (or adjacent properties) is 50 years old or older, describe that element in detail. For example, if you are working on a historic building or district (or there is one adjacent), describe the age (give year built if available), whether or not it's included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places, and the type of activities being planned or designed for your project.
    • Provide a detailed description of any project activities that might now or someday have an effect on the environment so that we may review the actions under the NEPA. Be very specific. For example, if you will be doing cleanup of a site, describe exactly what needs to be cleaned. Is it litter on the site or toxic waste that needs to be cleaned up? If you will be installing public art, describe the previous use of the property and why you think the land is not likely to be contaminated.
    • If you have any correspondence from your State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) or other authorities who monitor historic assets, please attach the correspondence.
    • If you have conducted a review according to your state's environmental quality laws or soil testing on your own, please attach an executive summary of that review. Do not submit a report.
    • If local authorities have issued any permits for your project, describe them.
    • If you don't have documentation, but you have talked to state or local authorities regarding historic or environmental concerns, describe your efforts, including when they took place.
  5. If an Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization may attach religious and/or cultural significance to historic properties touched by your project, please describe. We may contact you for additional documentation.

    • Make this assessment regardless of the location of the property, as the circumstances of history may have resulted in an Indian tribe now being located a great distance from its ancestral homelands and places of importance.
    • If a property is owned by a tribe or Native Hawaiian organization, let us know.
    • Identify the names of the tribe(s) or Native Hawaiian organization(s) you refer to, if any.

We may contact you for additional documentation.