Podcasts

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z
Headshot of a woman.
Photo by Dezel Golart

Author, National Book Award winner and four-time host of POL finals

Elizabeth Acevedo is a poet and novelist whose books are alive with Dominican-American and Afro- Caribbean culture and community and have at their centers teenage girls learning to navigate life, relaxing into and pushing against their upbringings. A National Poetry Slam Champion, Liz’s second book The Poet X won the National Book Award for young people’s literature in 2018. (And in case you haven’t read it—and if you haven’t, you should-- The Poet X is a novel in verse that tells the story of 15 year-old Xiomara as she wrestles with her mother’s expectations and discovers herself through slam poetry.)

Since The Poet X, Elizabeth Acevedo has written two more highly acclaimed books: With the Fire on High, a novel told in prose about Emoni a high school student who’s a mother and who’s also determined to become a chef. And now, most recently, Clap When You Land -- once again a novel in verse—that has as its jumping off point a tragic plane crash, the lies and secrets it reveals, and what’s lost and what’s found in the face of terrible grief. Clap When You Land looks at family and community across two cultures from the perspective of two generations of women—all fierce, capable and imperfect. Elizabeth Acevedo is as lively and charismatic a guest as she is a writer. In this podcast, she talks about her own family who inflamed her imagination with stories, her love for the Dominican Republic even as she understands its flaws, the profound difficulty of uprooting oneself and leaving one country for another, and the challenges and joy of having deep connections to multiple worlds.

John Adams head shot
Photo by Christine Alicino

Composer, Conductor, and 2009 NEA Opera Honoree

Creating American music that’s intense, sensual, and meaningful.

Sheila Kay Adams
Photo by Susan Moore

2013 NEA National Heritage Fellow

Singer, musician and storyteller Sheila Kay Adams talks about (and sings) songs brought over from England, Scotland, and Ireland in the mid-17th century and kept alive by the people in the mountains of North Carolina. [32:38]

Sheila Kay Adams
  Photo by Kim Dryden

2013 NEA National Heritage Fellow

In the second part of a two-part interview, we hear Sheila as storyteller and learn about some of the folks who lived in Sodom, North Carolina. [29:49]

Headshot of a woman.
Photo by Kursat Bayhan

Award-winning photojournalist

With her memoir, It’s What I Do, Lynsey Addario explains how and why she covers war.

Jamey Aebersold
Photo by John Nation

2014 NEA Jazz Master

Musician and teacher Jamey Aebersold believes that anyone can improvise and he's developed the tools to show them how. [27:11]

Headshot of a man playing a flute.
Photo by Mike Wolforth

2016 National Heritage Fellow and Dakota flute player and maker

Reinvigorating a traditional First Nation art

Jane Alexander headshot
Photo by Joan Marcus

Actor and former Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jane Alexander reflects on her time at the NEA, her life-long love affair with theater, and the centrality of art to the human experience.

AlHaj headshot
Photo by Jim Gale

Oud-player, composer, and 2015 National Heritage Fellow

Speaking the universal language of music.

Julia Alvarez
Photo © Bill Eichner

NEA Literature Fellow and 2013 National Medal of Arts recipient

Writer Julia Alvarez discusses how her life as a reader led to her life as a writer and the rich source material she finds in her family's immigrant experience. [22:05]

Pages