Podcasts

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Ron Carter
Photo by Tom Pich

NEA Jazz Master

NEA Jazz Master Ron Carter, bassist/cellist/educator extraordinaire, talks about his career playing jazz and classical music. [25:21]

Sarah Cash
Courtesy of the Corcoran Gallery of Art

Curator of the American Art Wing at the Corcoran Gallery

Sarah Cash discusses the making of a great collection of American art.

Veronica Castillo
Photo by Michael G. Stewart

Clay Artist, 2013 National Heritage Fellow

In Translation: Verónica Castillo expands a traditional Mexican art form, the Tree of Life, to express the need for social justice in the 21st century.

Daisy Castro
Photo courtesy of the Castro Family

Gypsy Jazz Violinist

16 year-old Daisy Castro gets to the heart of gypsy jazz. [28:00]

Headshot of a woman.

Poet, Playwright, Broadcaster

Meet Maryland’s new poet laureate Grace Cavalieri. Grace is a language maven: she’s a poet (24 published books and chapbooks), a playwright (26 produced plays), and a broadcaster (creator and host of The Poet and the Poem, a public radio series now in its 42nd year). Her range of subject is matched by the depth of her observations. Her poems about old age can break your heart and make you laugh; she sometimes channels other women’s voices writing a series of poems as Anna Nicole Smith and another as Mary Wollstonecraft. She’s a poetic force to be reckoned to be reckoned with. Now, at the age of 86, Grace Cavalieri has been named Maryland’s new poet laureate. In this podcast, you’ll learn about where she’s been and where she’s going, how she made time for writing as a Navy wife with four kids, her long marriage to the boy she met when she was in junior high school, her loss at his passing, and her plans as poet laureate.

Nick Cave

Photo by Matias Roskos

Artist

Nick Cave, chosen to participate in the U.S. State Department's Arts-in-Embassies program, talks about his Sound Suits, a unique blend of sculpture, fashion, and dance. [26:13]

Jim 'Texas Shorty' Chancellor
Photo by Alan Govenar

NEA National Heritage Fellow

2010 National Heritage Fellow, Jim "Texas Shorty" Chancellor talks about the great tradition of Texas fiddling. [25:43]

Headshot of a woman.

Award-winning cartoonist and Big Read author draws the lines of absurdity

Head shot of Ping Chong
Photo by Adam Nadel

Theater director, playwright, and video artist

Ping Chong, a visionary citizen-artist and six-time NEA grantee, connects racial history to our current unrest in his recent play, Collidescope: Adventures in Pre- and Post-Racial America.

Faces of two african american male twins
Nnamdi Chukwuocha and Albert Mills. Photo courtesy of the Delaware Division of the Arts

The Twin Poets Laureate of Delaware

Poets and social workers, the twins’ primary audience have been Wilmington’s underserved children.

Headshots of a woman.
Photo by Richard Church, Pottawatomi and Ottawa

2018 National Heritage Fellow

2018 National Heritage Fellow Kelly Church is a black ash basket maker. An Anishinaabe belonging to the Gun Lake Potawami Band, Kelly combines the centuries-old tradition of tree harvesting and processing ash trees, creating ribbons of ash that she then weaves with her own keen visual sense which result in stunningly original baskets. Tied to her artistry is dep commitment to keeping this tradition not just alive but vital. She’s taken on a task that’s become more difficult and more urgent, since the ash tree is being destroyed by an invasive species the emerald ash borer. In this podcast, Kelly Church takes us on the journey of taking a living tree and recreating it as a basket, the significance of the black ash tree for the North East people, and the steps she’s taking to keeping this traditional art intact for the next generations.

Headshot of a woman.
Photo by  Joanne Mullin

Filmmaker

Aislinn Clarke is the first Northern Irish woman to direct a feature-length horror film The Devil’s Doorway, and she brought a particularly female point-of-view by setting it in a Magdalene Laundry in 1960 Ireland. The Magdalene Laundries were institutions run by the Catholic church that were real-life horror stories for an untold number of women. They were essentially workhouses for women of “ill-repute” which could mean unwed mothers, prostitutes, women who wouldn’t get out of the way…the list of women who could be put away is quite long and varied. Aislinn Clarke feels connected to the laundries—shockingly, the last one closed in 1996—there was one in the town she grew up in and her father worked for a bakery and would deliver bread to the place. His stories stayed with her…as did his love for film, particularly horror films. Aislinn and I have a wide-ranging conversation about the history of the Magdalene Laundries, women in the film industry, what makes a good horror film and not a word about St. Patrick!

headshots of Maria Jukic and Tom Schorgl, side by side

What happens when innovative medical practitioners join with a lively arts community?

Find out from Maria Jukic, executive director of Cleveland’s Clinic’s Arts and Medicine Institute and Tom Schorgl, director of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture.

Sara Coffey
Photo by Jeff Woodward

Arts programmer and presenter

Co-Founder of the Vermont Performance Lab, Sara Coffey talks about creating spaces and community support for contemporary dance in rural Vermont.  [26:06]

Sara Colangelo posing with a night cityscape behind her.
Photo by Shlomo Godder

Director and screenwriter

Her debut feature film Little Accidents takes us into the heart of a coal-mining town.

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