Podcasts

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Headshot of a woman.
Photo by Tom Pich

2018 National Heritage Fellow and African American Quilter

2018 National Heritage Fellow African American Quilter Marion Coleman is a story teller with fabric. Her narrative quilts depict personal stories, history, and portraits…from small nightclubs in Oakland to a series about Black Cowboys to the life story of the first African American woman pilot—Marion’s quilts create visual stories. She’s combines both traditional and contemporary quiltmaking techniques, using ceramics, whole garments, buttons, paper, and photographs in her quilts. Sometimes, she transfers photo imagery onto the quilt itself—which she then fills in with fabric. Her distinctive way of looking at the world is apparent in her conversation as well. Listen to the podcast and follow Marion from Texas to Oakland where she had a thirty year career as a social worker and became one of the most innovative quilters of her time.

Headshots of a woman.
Photo by Richard Church, Pottawatomi and Ottawa

2018 National Heritage Fellow

2018 National Heritage Fellow Kelly Church is a black ash basket maker. An Anishinaabe belonging to the Gun Lake Potawami Band, Kelly combines the centuries-old tradition of tree harvesting and processing ash trees, creating ribbons of ash that she then weaves with her own keen visual sense which result in stunningly original baskets. Tied to her artistry is dep commitment to keeping this tradition not just alive but vital. She’s taken on a task that’s become more difficult and more urgent, since the ash tree is being destroyed by an invasive species the emerald ash borer. In this podcast, Kelly Church takes us on the journey of taking a living tree and recreating it as a basket, the significance of the black ash tree for the North East people, and the steps she’s taking to keeping this traditional art intact for the next generations.

Headshot of a man.
Photo by Lucas Chilczuk

Principal Dancer, American Ballet Theatre

Herman Cornejo is about to celebrate 20 years with American Ballet Theatre—spending 15 of those years as a principal dancer. You could say the Argentina-born Cornejo practically grew up at ABT. He came to the company as an apprentice at the age of 17; yet, he was already considered a prodigy. The previous year, he had won the Gold Medal at the prestigious International Moscow Competition becoming the youngest dancer ever to do so. Over the past twenty years, Herman has developed a repertoire of more than 90 classical, contemporary and modern ballets—working with some of today’s greatest choreographers including Justin Peck and Alexei Ratmansky. Herman Cornejo is also as charming as he is talented. In this podcast, he talks about becoming a dancer in Argentina, joining ABT—his dream company, the secret sauce to a good partnership, and the process of learning a dance that a choreographer “makes on him.”

CREATIVE FORCES logo

Healing and building community through art

The first part of this week’s podcast looks at Creative Forces : NEA Military Healing Initiative. NEA Chairman Jane Chu and others reflect on the power of art to heal physical and psychological trauma as well as strengthen families and build community. In part 2, Sebastian Junger discusses his book, Tribe—which looks at the profound sense of loss some combat veterans feel when they return from deployment, and the various ways that art and ritual can help them re-enter their communities.

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Award-winning cartoonist and Big Read author draws the lines of absurdity

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Photo by Reed Hummell

Executive Director of Metro Nashville Arts Commission

Creating places for the arts and for artists

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Author and 2004 NEA Literature Fellow

Justin Cronin brings his post-apocalyptic Passage trilogy to a close with The City of Mirrors.

Headshot of Johnnetta Cole
photo credit: Jessica Suworoff, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution

Director of Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art

Dr. Cole’s mission is to inspire a love of art especially in girls from under-represented communities.

Faces of two african american male twins
Nnamdi Chukwuocha and Albert Mills. Photo courtesy of the Delaware Division of the Arts

The Twin Poets Laureate of Delaware

Poets and social workers, the twins’ primary audience have been Wilmington’s underserved children.

Graphic showing a colorful 50.

Nonprofit Musician/Composer Collective

A half-century of musical innovation and self-determination, told by AACM co-founder (currently AACM-New York president) and 2010 NEA Jazz Master Muhal Richard Abrams, current AACM-Chicago chairman Ernest Dawkins, and AACM member and 2014 NEA Jazz Master Anthony Braxton.

Wayne Carr headshot
Photo Courtesy of the Folger Theatre

Actor/ Company Member of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

From Pericles to Tupac Shakur, Wayne Carr embodies fully-realized characters on the stage.

Sara Colangelo posing with a night cityscape behind her.
Photo by Shlomo Godder

Director and screenwriter

Her debut feature film Little Accidents takes us into the heart of a coal-mining town.

Head shot of Ping Chong
Photo by Adam Nadel

Theater director, playwright, and video artist

Ping Chong, a visionary citizen-artist and six-time NEA grantee, connects racial history to our current unrest in his recent play, Collidescope: Adventures in Pre- and Post-Racial America.

headshots of Maria Jukic and Tom Schorgl, side by side

What happens when innovative medical practitioners join with a lively arts community?

Find out from Maria Jukic, executive director of Cleveland’s Clinic’s Arts and Medicine Institute and Tom Schorgl, director of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture.

Photo by Lee Pellegrini, Boston College
Photo by Lee Pellegrini, Boston College

2013 NEA National Heritage Fellow

It's a tuneful podcast as we go to the heart of Irish music with Seamus Connolly.

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