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Rachael Holmes
Photo courtesy of Rachael Holmes

Actress

At the intersection of theater and social activism: Citizen Artist Rachael Holmes. [26:52]

Headshots of a man.
Photo courtesy of Great Performances

Executive producer of Great Performances

Great Performances has been on the air for more than 40 years and Executive Producer David Horn has been there for 39 of them. In many ways, Great Performances, which is the longest running performing arts anthology on television, has been shaped by his vision. The series has brought the performing arts into American homes—from opera to dance, from musicals to drama to concerts. In this podcast, Horn takes us behind the scenes of Great Performances: he explains what goes into putting a Broadway play on television; why and how he brought Shakespeare back to public television with some major star-power; his experiences directing Chita Rivera, Tony Bennett, and Lady Gaga; and his embrace of new technology and new media to both enhance the viewing experience and build new audiences. He’s a deeply thoughtful man who has done a wide variety of extraordinary work for decades. He knows everyone, and I’m not sure when he sleeps.

Headshot of a woman.
Photo by Dave Hall

Author, Crime Fiction

With her character Lou Norton, Hall creates one of the few African American female detectives.

Richard Hunt headshot

Sculptor

Richard Hunt talks about creating large pieces of abstract art for public spaces and reflects on his time on the National Council of the Arts.

Wil Haygood
Photo Courtesy of the Columbus Museum of Art

Journalist, author, and cultural historian

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance, the intellectual, social and artistic burst of African-American culture that erupted in the Harlem neighborhood in New York City. The Columbus Museum of Art is marking the anniversary with a dazzling exhibition I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100. Through paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, contemporary documents, books and posters, the exhibition sheds light on both breadth and depth of the Harlem Renaissance. Wil Haygood-a Columbus native-was guest curator and author of the companion book I, Too, Sing America. In this week’s podcast, Wil and I talk about the Harlem Renaissance: the lives of its artists and the spectacular work they produced, the social history that informed the art movement, and the work of bringing it all together in the exhibit and the book.

Headshot of a man.
Photo by Bob Haggart Jr.

Pianist and 2017 NEA Jazz Master

A musical shape-shifter.

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