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Eddie Palmieri

Photo by by Jason Goodman

2013 NEA Jazz Master

Pianist, bandleader, composer and 2013 NEA Jazz Master, Eddie Palmieri talks about his innovative music which blends Afro-Cuban rhythms with jazz. [32:21]

Pratibha Parmar
Photo by Donald Maclellan

Filmmaker

Pratibha Parmar discusses making the recent documentary about an iconic American writer, Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth, which can be seen on the American Masters’ website. [27:59]

The Paschall Brothers

Photo courtey of Virginia Folklife Program

Tidewater Gospel Group, 2012 National Heritage Fellowship recipients

Three generations of Paschalls have brought beautiful harmonies to their community. [35:21]

 Sailja Patel
Photo by Heather Lewis

Poet, theater artist, and activist

With a trunk full of her mother’s saris, Kenyan author and performer Shaija Patel reclaims a lost history. [29:28]

Benjamin Percy
Photo by Jennifer May

NEA Literature Fellow

In his current novel, Red Moon, Ben Percy serves up a hybrid of horror and literature to tell a story about our lives today. [35:10]

Carla Perlo
Photo by Enoch Chan

Founder and Artistic Director of Dance Place

How Dance Place’s open door policy helped transform an underserved neighborhood into a vital arts district.

Collage of headshots.

Director and cast of the documentary, Personal Statement

Director of the documentary Personal Statement Juliane Dressner and the cast students Karoline Jimenez, Christine Rodriguez, and Enoch Jemmott join me to talk about the film which documents the challenges New York public school students have when applying to college—especially when they are the first generation in their family to make the leap. There is a profound lack of college counselors in public schools which often leaves students on their own to negotiate applications, financial forms, and personal statements. But back in 2005, students themselves got together and created a peer counseling program where they can get the training to help not just themselves but their fellow students as well. Karoline, Christine and Enoch, although they’re facing challenges of their own and struggle with their own college possibilities, embrace their roles as peer counselors and pour their hearts and souls into helping their classmates succeed.

Dr. Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw and John Vick standing side by side facing the camera
Dr. Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw and John Vick, curators of Represent: 200 Years of African American Art at the PMA

With a new exhibit and catalogue-- both titled REPRESENT, the Philadelphia Museum of Art puts its extensive collection of African American art on view

Organizing curator John Vick and consulting curator/editor Dr. Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw tell us about its rich history.

Nathaniel Philbrick
Courtesy of Nathaniel Philbrick

Author, National Book Award winner

In a slim, lucid and compulsively readable book, Nathaniel Philbrick makes an enthusiastic case for taking a look at Melville’s classic Moby-Dick.

Jnennifer Pickering
Photo courtesy of LEAF

Founder and director of LEAF Community Arts

For Jennifer Pickering, all art is both local and global and LEAF is that philosophy in action.

Laura Lippman

Photo by Jan Cobb

Master of horror

Mystery Writer Laura Lippman talks about the terrifying brilliance of Edgar Allan Poe. [29:32]

Sam Pollard headshot
Sam Pollard © LaMont Hamilton Photographic Imaging

Filmmaker

Filmmaker Sam Pollard talks about his new documentary August Wilson: The Ground on which I Stand.

Dave Porter headshot
Photo by Thomas Mikusz

Television and Film Composer

Dave Porter’s iconic music is an essential part of the story: Think Breaking Bad, and Better Call Saul.

Headshot of a man.
Photo by Maria Virginia Prieto Solis

2016 Bess Lomax Hawes NEA National Heritage Fellow

2016 Bess Lomax Hawes NEA National Heritage Fellow Artemio Posadas has spent his life keeping the musical tradition of son huasteco vibrant. Son huasteco is a rich and complicated musical tradition. Beginning in Northeastern Mexico in the late 19th century, it combines distinctive rhythms, musical solos—with the violin taking a major role, poetry and dance. Improvisation is key; but so is participation. This isn’t a tradition that separates musicians and audience, and the dancers feet provide beats and rhythms in response to the music. Artemio Posadas grew up with son huasteco , and he brought it with him when he moved to the Bay area in the 1970s teaching this tradition through the generations. In this music-filled podcast, we’ll hear Artemio talk about his love of son huasteco in all its multi-dimensionality. Posadas’ apprentice, musician and anthropologist Russell Rodriguez serves as interpreter.

headshots of two men.
Photo courtesy of Armed Services Arts Partnership

Founding Director and current Executive Director of Armed Services Arts Partnership

In 2013, when Sam Pressler was an undergraduate, he came to a profound understanding of the civilian/military divide and the sobering realities many veterans face when they return to civilian life. Based on his own experiences of coping with loss, he thought comedy might be a way to help returning veterans cope. Since there weren’t any comedy classes for veterans, he started one—partnering with an existing writing group. From that one class, the idea of Armed Services Arts Partnership (or ASAP) grew and flourished. Located in Hampton Roads Virginia and the Washington, DC area, ASAP has reached close to 1,000 veterans, service members, and their families through over 200 workshops and classes. It’s also produced 150 performances of its graduates—including shows at the White House—and reached some 15,000 audience members. Sam Pressler—who recently stepped down as executive director and now sits on the board of ASAP—and the current executive director Brian Jenkins tell us how ASAP came together and grew into a thriving and beloved organization and what they’ve learned about community, veterans, and the arts. It’s a great story.

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