Podcasts

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Jnennifer Pickering
Photo courtesy of LEAF

Founder and director of LEAF Community Arts

For Jennifer Pickering, all art is both local and global and LEAF is that philosophy in action.

Laura Lippman

Photo by Jan Cobb

Master of horror

Mystery Writer Laura Lippman talks about the terrifying brilliance of Edgar Allan Poe. [29:32]

Sam Pollard headshot
Sam Pollard © LaMont Hamilton Photographic Imaging

Filmmaker

Filmmaker Sam Pollard talks about his new documentary August Wilson: The Ground on which I Stand.

Dave Porter headshot
Photo by Thomas Mikusz

Television and Film Composer

Dave Porter’s iconic music is an essential part of the story: Think Breaking Bad, and Better Call Saul.

Headshot of a man.
Photo by Maria Virginia Prieto Solis

2016 Bess Lomax Hawes NEA National Heritage Fellow

2016 Bess Lomax Hawes NEA National Heritage Fellow Artemio Posadas has spent his life keeping the musical tradition of son huasteco vibrant. Son huasteco is a rich and complicated musical tradition. Beginning in Northeastern Mexico in the late 19th century, it combines distinctive rhythms, musical solos—with the violin taking a major role, poetry and dance. Improvisation is key; but so is participation. This isn’t a tradition that separates musicians and audience, and the dancers feet provide beats and rhythms in response to the music. Artemio Posadas grew up with son huasteco , and he brought it with him when he moved to the Bay area in the 1970s teaching this tradition through the generations. In this music-filled podcast, we’ll hear Artemio talk about his love of son huasteco in all its multi-dimensionality. Posadas’ apprentice, musician and anthropologist Russell Rodriguez serves as interpreter.

Headshot of a man.
Photo courtesy of Nate Powell

Cartoonist and 2016 National Book Award winner

Cartoonist Nate Powell is the 2016 National Book Award co-winner for Young People’s Literature. He shared the prize with Rep John Lewis and Andrew Aydin for the graphic memoir/history March. March is a trilogy, and it tells the story of the Civil Rights movement through the eyes of Congressman John Lewis. From a very young age, John Lewis was involved in the fight for racial equality through non-violent action. As one of the leaders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Lewis was present at pivotal moments in the struggle for civil rights, including lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the March across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. In this week’s podcast, Nate Powell talks about how he captured those moments in cartoons, the challenges of representing figures who well-known like Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr. and how he grappled with portraying the horrifying violence endured by protestors in a medium so often occupied with super-heroes and super-villains. Nate is thoughtful, smart, and in love with cartooning. I learned a lot.

headshots of two men.
Photo courtesy of Armed Services Arts Partnership

Founding Director and current Executive Director of Armed Services Arts Partnership

In 2013, when Sam Pressler was an undergraduate, he came to a profound understanding of the civilian/military divide and the sobering realities many veterans face when they return to civilian life. Based on his own experiences of coping with loss, he thought comedy might be a way to help returning veterans cope. Since there weren’t any comedy classes for veterans, he started one—partnering with an existing writing group. From that one class, the idea of Armed Services Arts Partnership (or ASAP) grew and flourished. Located in Hampton Roads Virginia and the Washington, DC area, ASAP has reached close to 1,000 veterans, service members, and their families through over 200 workshops and classes. It’s also produced 150 performances of its graduates—including shows at the White House—and reached some 15,000 audience members. Sam Pressler—who recently stepped down as executive director and now sits on the board of ASAP—and the current executive director Brian Jenkins tell us how ASAP came together and grew into a thriving and beloved organization and what they’ve learned about community, veterans, and the arts. It’s a great story.

Frank Price

Photo courtesy of Frank Price

Hollywood writer, producer and executive

In the first of a two-part interview, Frank Price talks about his early days as a television writer and producer of shows like The Virginian and Columbo. [28:40] 

Frank Price

Photo courtesy of Frank Price

Hollywood writer, producer and executive

In the 2nd part of our interview, Frank Price talks about the business of film making as well as some of the iconic films he’s made, including Tootsie, Gandhi, and Boyz in the Hood. [28:59]

Keri Putnam

Executive Director of the Sundance Institute

Keri Putnam discusses Film Forward, an initiative of the Sundance Institute and the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. Now in its second year, the program aims to enhance cross-cultural understanding, collaboration and dialogue through film. [25:49]

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