Podcasts

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Headshots of a man.
Photo courtesy of HBO

Actor, director, producer

Actor Jeffrey Wright discusses the documentary he produced for HBO, We Are Not Done Yet, which profiles a group of veterans and service members as they come together to collaborate on a series of poems. The former and current service members are part of a United Services Organizations’ writing workshop at Walter Reed National Military Center; and, all of them struggle to cope with PTSD. The workshop creates a safe place for them to grapple with their experiences through poetry. In fact, they decide not just to write a poem collectively but to present a publicly staged reading of it. That’s where actor Jeffrey Wright came in—he had worked with veterans in the past and was looking for an opportunity to involve himself again. He came to Walter Reed to direct the staged reading of the poem. And that experience became the HBO documentary We Are Not Done Yet. Listen to this conversation with Jeffrey Wright about his work with these veterans, his continuing relationships with them, and his commitment to making sure their stories are heard.

Headshot of a woman.
Photo © blue lily photo

Y.A. fantasy/horror author

In her novel, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein, young adult author Kiersten White retells Mary Shelley’s classic. In White’s book, we get the story from Elizabeth Lavenza—the childhood companion and then wife of scientist Victor Frankenstein. Kiersten White closely follows the outline of Shelley’s Frankenstein, but by changing the point of view to Elizabeth, we get another story entirely about Victor Frankenstein, the monster, and Elizabeth herself. For this Halloween podcast, Kiersten and I talk about the original Frankenstein, Mary Shelley’s singular life, and the challenges and fun of taking this well-known classic tale, telling it from a different perspective, and finding a story that hadn’t been told before.

Matthew Wiley
Photo Courtesy of The Good of the Hive. All rights reserved

Muralist

The Good of the Hive is more than an art project.

Walter Ware
Photo courtesy of Walter Ware III

Casting Director

Casting Director Walter Ware III brings the right people together. Read all about the behind-the-scenes crew in NEA Arts

headshot of a man with a hat.
Photo by Bibiana Huang Matheis

2017 National Heritage Fellow and Blues Harmonica Player

Bringing It All Home.

Headshot of a woman.
Photo by Juna F. Nagle

2014 National Book Award Recipient

With Another Brooklyn, acclaimed children’s author Jacqueline Woodson creates an adult novel that reads like poetry

Headshot of a man.
Photo courtesy of the artist

Actor

Wright on the transformative power of theater and his two portrayals of MLK.

Headshot of Michael Witmore

Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Shakespeare’s World and Ours.

Headshot of Joe Wilson wearing a straw hat.
Photo by Tom Pich

NEA National Heritage Fellow, Advocate for Folk and Traditional Arts

2001 NEA National Heritage Fellow Joe Wilson weaves his storytelling spell into the history of Blue Ridge Mountain culture.

Sam White head shot
Courtesy of Sam White

Founder and Artistic Director of Shakespeare in Detroit

Sam White loves Shakespeare and loves her hometown Detroit. So she emptied her bank account and started a site-specific professional theater company, Shakespeare in Detroit. It’s amazing.

Jesmyn Ward
Photo by Tony Cook

Author and 2011 National Book Award winner

In her memoir Men We Reaped, Jesmyn Ward attempts to understand the links in the untimely deaths of her brother and four friends.

Yvonne Walker Keshick
Photo by Michael G. Stewart

Quill worker and 2014 National Heritage Fellow

Yvonne Walker Keshick brings a Native-American tradition into the 21st century.

Heather Wood
Photo courtesy of Bauman Redanty and Shaul

Actor

Heather Wood talks about the joys and challenges of performing Shakespeare. [27:31]

Robert Ward
Photo by Daniel Schwartz

Composer and 2011 NEA Opera Honoree

Toward the end of his life, Robert Ward discussed his remarkable career in music. [29:15]

Terry Tempest Williams. Photo by Louis Gakumba
Photo by Louis Gakumba

Writer and Naturalist

In her latest book, When Women Were Birds, Terry Tempest Williams explores the legacy of her mother’s journals. [28:11]

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