Surprising Findings in Three New NEA Reports on the Arts: Infographics Descriptions

from Surprising Findings in Three New NEA Reports on the Arts (January 12, 2015)

INFOGRAPHIC #1 - This infographic illustrates key findings from the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account.  

KEY MESSAGE: The arts drive economic growth

Main headline: What’s the economic value of the arts?

Subheadlines/key findings          

  • $698 Billion (or 4% to GDP) - what the arts contribute to the U.S. economy. i
  • Top arts/culture industries  - broadcasting; motion picture and video industries; publishing; retail trade; the performing arts & independent artists; and advertising services. ii
  • 4.7 million workers in arts & cultural sector, they get $334.9 billion in compensation. iii
  • $25 billion trade surplus in 2012 - an all time high. iv
  • For every 100 jobs created from new demand for the arts, 62 additional jobs are also created. v
  • $105 billion - wealth created by arts sector.  70% of these investments are from ‘entertainment originals’ such as movies, TV shows, and books. vi
  • Arts and culture contributes $433.5 billion/50% of the entire creative economy ($869 billion in GDP from copyright-intensive industries).  Arts and culture contributes half of the U.S. creative economy. vii
  • Advanced economies depend on innovation for growth.  Look no further than the arts!

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INFOGRAPHIC #2 - This infographic illustrates key findings from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts

KEY MESSAGE:  New NEA report shows an expansive menu of ways that people participate in the arts

Main headline: How do Americans participate in the arts? 

Subhead - Live arts (performing and visual arts)

  • Adults who went to performing arts or museums as children 3-4x more likely to attend as adults. viii
  • 51 percent of adults attended a broad range of live visual or performing arts activities (from salsa music performances to craft fairs) ix, compared to the 46% who exercised or did a sports activity. x
  • Colorado, North Dakota, and Maryland had a 50% performing arts attendance rate (state average was 37%). xi

Subhead - art making and art sharing

  • Some popular genres: social dance (32%) xii, sharing photography (27%) xiii, singing or playing an instrument with others (15%) xiv and fiber arts (13%). xv
  • 19% use electronic media to share art they created, edited, or remixed. xvi
  • African Americans more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to create or perform visual arts or music through electronic media. xvii
  • Men 4x more than women to use electronic media to create or perform music. xviii

Subhead - arts and electronic media

  • 71% used electronic media to watch or listen to art. xix
  • 54 % watch or listen to broadcast arts performances on TV & radio; 45% use the Internet. xx
  • 1/3(34%) of adults used an electronic device to download, watch, or listen to music. xxi

Subhead - arts learning

  • More young adults report taking art classes or lessons in childhood in past 10 years. xxii
  • More African Americans and Hispanics took acting, dance, creative writing, music classes. xxiii
  • Most popular childhood arts classes (in or out of school): voice training or playing an instrument (36 percent), visual arts (19 percent), art appreciation or art history (18 percent). xxiv

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INFOGRAPHIC #3 - This infographic illustrates key findings from When Going Gets Tough: Barriers and Motivations Affecting Arts Attendance

KEY MESSAGE:  -  Share key findings of research on motivations, barriers, and attitudes towards arts attendance, and suggest ways to improve arts attendance based on this information. 

Main headline: Why do people attend the arts?

Subhead line: Motivations

  • socializing with friends or family members (73%) xxv
  • learning new things (64%) xxvi
  • experiencing high-quality art (63%) xxvii
  • supporting the community (51%) xxviii

Subheadline:  Barriers

  • lack of time (47%) xxix
  • high cost (38%) xxx
  • too difficult to get there/physical handicap (37%) xxxi
  • noone to go with (22%) xxxii

Subheadline:  Values

  • devotion/loyalty (83%) xxxiii
  • listening to other perspectives (76%) xxxiv
  • being creative, original (60%) xxxv
  • trying new things (47%) xxxvi
  • excitement, adventure, risk-taking (28%) xxxvii

Subheadline:  Lifestyles

  • half of U.S. adults attend the arts with friends xxxviii
  • parents of children under 6 go to socialize (68%)
  • young adult full-time students (18-34) attend most in that age group xxxix
  • retirees go to experience high quality art
  • social isolation/poor health are barriers for older adults xl

Subheadline:  Attitudes

  • How you view your social status affects whether and why you go. 
  • Despite similar incomes, only 48% who identified as working class attended; 67% of middle class did. xli
  • Adults with no high school diploma/ lowest income attend the arts to learn (76%) 
  • First generation immigrants more likely than the average arts-goer to attend on their own. xlii

Subheadline: Ideas to reach the missing audience

  • Couple low-cost admission with learning-focused programming xliii
  • Increase community engagement
  • Market to couples deciding on “date night” options
  • Provide opportunities to socialize and experience new art forms
  • Address the motivations and barriers and change perceptions and behaviors!

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Footnotes

i. ACPSA Issue Brief #1: The Arts and GDP, page 1
ii. ACPSA Issue Brief #1: The Arts and GDP, page 1
ii. ACPSA Issue Brief #2: Workers Engaged in Arts and Cultural Production, page 1
iv. ACPSA Brief #X: Imports and Exports of Arts and Cultural Goods and Services, page 1
v. ACPSA Issue Brief #6: The Impact of New Demand for Arts and Culture, page 1
vi. ACPSA Issue Brief #4: Arts and Cultural Contributions to the Creative Economy, page 7
vii. ACPSA Issue Brief #4: Arts and Cultural Contributions to the Creative Economy, page 1
viii. SPPA Revised Sample Findings, Page 10
vix. Chart ES-1. Percentage of adults who participated in the arts, by broad category of participation: 2012, page XI.
x. SPPA Full Report, Figure A-3. Percentage of U.S. adults who exercised or participated in a sports activity: 2012, page 97.
xi. SPPA Revised Sample Findings, page 1
xii. 2012 Survey of Public Participation in the arts.  Art-Making and Art-Sharing Activities Ranked by Percent of U.S. Adults Who Participated: 2012, page 34.
xiii. 2012 Survey of Public Participation in the arts.  Art-Making and Art-Sharing Activities Ranked by Percent of U.S. Adults Who Participated: 2012, page 34.
xiv. Full SPPA report, Figure 3-3. Percentage of U.S. adults engaging in the performing arts, by activity: 2012 (see "Perform with Others" column), page 42
xv. 2012 Survey of Public Participation in the arts.  Art-Making and Art-Sharing Activities Ranked by Percent of U.S. Adults Who Participated: 2012, page 34.
xvi. SPPA Full report, page 38
xvii. SPPA, page 51, Figure 3-11. Percentage of U.S. adults using electronic media to create or perform the arts they created in the past 12 months, by art form: 2012
xviii. SPPA Full Report, Figure 3-10. Demographic distribution of U.S. adults using electronic media to create or perform any of the arts they created in the past 12 months, by art form: 2012, page 50
xix. SPPA Full Report, Chart ES-1. Percentage of adults who participated in the arts, by broad category of participation: 2012,  page XI
xx. SPPA Full Report, page 27
xxi. SPPA Full Report, Figure 2-7. Percentage of U.S. adults who used mobile or handheld devices to explore the arts: 2012, page 36.
xxii. SPPA Full Report, page XII
xxiii. SPPA Full Report, page 56
xxiv. SPPA Full Report: Figure 4-1. Percentage of U.S. adults who took arts lessons or classes during their lifetime, by art form studied: 2002, 2008, and 2012, page 58
xxv. When Going Gets Tough, Table II 1. Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Attended the Visual and/or Performing Arts in the Past 12 Months, by Motivations for Attending the Most Recent Event (2012), page 10
xxvi. When Going Gets Tough, ibid.
xxvii. When Going Gets Tough, ibid.
xxviii. When Going Gets Tough, ibid.
xxix. When Going Gets Tough, Table II-2. Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Were Interested in, But Did Not Attend, the Visual and/or Performing Arts in the Past 12 Months, by Barriers Cited, page 15.
xxx. When Going Gets Tough, ibid
xxxi. ibid
xxxii. ibid
xxxiii. When Going Gets Tough, Page 40: Figure V-1.  Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Agree or Strongly Agree with Value Statements Significant in Predicting Arts Attendance, by Whether They Attended or Were Interested in Attending the Visual and/or Performing Arts in the Past 12 Months (2012)
xxxiv. ibid
xxxv. ibid
xxxvi. ibid
xxxvii. ibid
xxxviii. When Going Gets Tough, page 29
xxxix. When Going Gets Tough, page 30
xl. When Going Gets Tough, page 37
xli. When Going Gets Tough, page 22
xlii. When Going Gets Tough, page 24
xliii. When Going Gets Tough, page 45.