Writers' Corner

NEA Literature Fellows Features

"[I]f we're all writing the same poem, what's the point?" — Camille Rankine As 2017 NEA Literature Fellow Camille Rankine told us in a recent phone interview, "[Writing is...
Read our interview with new NEA Literature Fellow Sandra Gail Lambert here .
“My job as a writer is to offer at least some small part of what saved me to others.” — Sandra Gail Lambert Though Sandra Gail Lambert didn't start writing seriously until her late 30s—publishing her first novel at 62—there are advantages to being a "late bloomer." As she herself put it, "Emotional...
Winter was made for curling up with a good read. While we’re busy updating our Writer’s Corner with excerpts from our latest round of NEA Literature Fellows, we wanted to make sure your appetite for reading remains sated. Below are quotes from and links to interviews we’ve conducted with NEA...
"[I]f we're all writing the same poem, what's the point?" -- Camille Rankine As newly minted NEA Literature Fellow Camille Rankine told us in a recent phone interview, "[Writing is...
Sometimes you go to junior college just to play basketball and then, years later, thanks to the continuing encouragement of a series of mentors, you find that you’re not only a published poet teaching at a prestigious university but you’re also this close to having your PhD. At least that’s how it...
Just one more day until literature-apalooza comes to Washington, DC--or as it's more commonly known, the Library of Congress National Book Festival. We're excited to be festival partners once again, hosting the NEA Poetry and Prose Stage with the writers listed below, many of them NEA Literature...
Joy Harjo is one of seven NEA Literature Fellows reading at the 2016 National Book Festival at the NEA’s Poetry and Prose stage. Her poetry collection, How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems 1975-2001, is also one of the new titles in the NEA Big Read library. From the NEA Arts special 50th...
While Katherine E. Young currently serves as the Poet Laureate for Arlington, Virginia, her first serious study of poetry was not in English, but in Russian. As Young explained when we spoke on the phone, her university training in the 1980s and 90s in Russian and international affairs led her to...
Meet new Literature Translation Fellow David Shook.

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