Art Works Blog

”Once you join an amateur group, you are a member of a great fraternity, whose purpose is the most dignified one you can imagine: to inspire one another and unite in building up a creation that is greater than one individual’s deeds." —Paul Hindemith, composer, in A Composer’s World Community music...
Let’s get one thing straight: newly named NEA Creative Writing Fellow Adam Ehrlich Sachs gets along just fine with his father, thank you very much. It’s a question that readers might find themselves pondering after reading Inherited Disorders: Stories, Parables, and Problems , Sachs’s debut story...
Revisit our interview with filmmaker Ramona Emerson here .
In preparation for the next issue of NEA Arts —our first-ever issue focusing on a single production by a single organization—we’ve asked everyone working on Signature Theatre’s production of The Gershwins®’ & Ken Ludwig’s Crazy for You® tons of questions: "How do you describe your job? What did...
There is a common, longstanding misconception that Native American art is synonymous with traditional art—beadwork or weaving for example. And yet, as the exhibition materials for Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound , state: “This limiting interpretation does not recognize that tradition, by...
Most food tables at gallery openings include some iteration of wine and cheese. But at County Missives: Expressive Works from Incarcerated Juveniles Adjudicated as Adults , installed last spring at the Lufrano Intercultural Gallery at the University of North Florida (UNF), there was a table display...
“My job as a writer is to offer at least some small part of what saved me to others.” — Sandra Gail Lambert Though Sandra Gail Lambert didn't start writing seriously until her late 30s—publishing her first novel at 62—there are advantages to being a "late bloomer." As she herself put it, "Emotional...
Revisit our Art Talk with multi-disciplinary artist Merritt Johnson here .
Why does poetry seem like the appropriate gesture for this moment when we stop to say thank you to the countless numbers of men and women who have served our country, sometimes at the cost of their very lives? Perhaps it's the way the form cuts away what's extraneous to say only what is urgent and...
American artists have chronicled war for centuries -- John Singleton Copley's The Death of Major Peirson (1784), Winslow Homer's Sounding Reveille (1865), and El Pozo (1898) by William Glackens, to name just a few. The advent of an official U.S. military art program, however, arrived in World War I...

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